Atty Corey Meyer Asks Ill. Justices To Disbar Him For Faking $4M Deal

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Documents that had Meyer’s alleged actions been subject to a hearing, his “admissions, bank records, court orders and records, and the testimony of various individuals” would prove he misled those clients about the status of their lawsuits

Atty Corey Meyer Asks Ill. Justices To Disbar Him For Faking $4M Deal

Law360 (August 15, 2018, 10:32 PM EDT) -- An Illinois attorney who’s accused of lying to clients for years about the status of their lawsuits, including when his law license was already suspended, has asked to be disbarred by the state’s Supreme Court.

The motion filed Monday by oft-disciplined attorney Corey Meyer came amid pending proceedings before Illinois’ Attorney Registration and Disciplinary Commission over charges it filed in April relating to his handling of two medical malpractice lawsuits between that he allegedly lied about filing too late.

The ARDC said in accompanying documents that had Meyer’s alleged actions been subject to a hearing, his “admissions, bank records, court orders and records, and the testimony of various individuals” would prove he misled those clients about the status of their lawsuits between 2005-2017 and forged at least one court document to falsely claim he secured a $3.9 million settlement in a client’s case despite it actually getting dismissed with prejudice.

The false settlement agreement came during Meyer’s representation of Jerry Oechsle, which began in 2005, according to the ARDC’s charges. Oechsle had asked Meyer to pursue his claim for defective spinal hardware that doctors installed following a 2002 snowmobiling incident, but Meyer had incorrectly named the hardware’s manufacturer and distributor when he filed suit seven years after agreeing to represent him, the commission said. 

Oechsle’s claims were time-barred by the time Meyer filed an amended complaint naming the proper parties in April 2013, which resulted in an Illinois federal judge dismissing them with prejudice.

But in the three years following that dismissal, the ARDC claimed, Meyer continued to mislead Oechsle by mentioning scheduled hearings and settlement negotiations that never existed.

Meyer also drafted the false settlement agreement, which featured the stamp of an Illinois state court judge, and included it in records he gave Oechsle when he visited his office in May 2017 demanding documents related to the case, the ARDC claimed. Oechsle presented the forged agreement to the judge’s clerk, but the clerk identified the order as a fake and Oechsle had to answer questions from the judge about the order, according to the commission’s charges.

“On that day, Oechsle learned for the first time that his legal matter had been dismissed with prejudice more than three years previously,” the ARDC said.

In another matter, Meyer agreed in 2012 to represent then 80-year-old Deores Kolin in a lawsuit over malfunctioning mesh for a hernia she’d undergone four surgeries in 10 years to repair, according to the ARDC’s charges.

But he “repeatedly” lied to Kolin over the next four years when she’d ask about her case’s status, and he still hadn’t filed a lawsuit on her behalf by the time she fired him in June 2016, the ARDC said. And in his response to the ARDC’s request for investigation of the Kolin matter, Meyer falsely stated she’d retained him two years later than his representation actually began, the commission said.

Meyer has received regulatory discipline twice before. He was first suspended for four months in 2011 for advising a client to file a medical malpractice suit in Michigan, where he was not licensed to practice law, and falsely listing the client as a self-represented litigant on pleadings without the client's knowledge. That client's lawsuit failed to comply with the state requirement to include an affidavit addressing the case's merits, though, which resulted in its dismissal for being time-barred. 

His second suspension came in 2015 for 18 months over his conversion of $35,000 from four personal injury matters, and for his failure to keep proper records of his client trust accounts.

The Illinois Supreme Court could rule on Meyer’s motion from today as early as its September term.

A representative for the ARDC declined comment Wednesday. Meyer did not immediately respond Wednesday to a request for comment.

Meyer is representing himself.

The ARDC is represented by commission counsel Chi Zhang.

The case is In re: Corey Edward Meyer, case number M.R. 029479, in the Supreme Court of Illinois.