The Illinois Attorney Registration & Disciplinary Commission suspended Scott Thomas Kamin, a Chicago Attorney

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The commission found that Kamin, who was licensed as an attorney in 1995, “dishonestly accepted service of a complaint and summonses for the subtenants in his office suite.” Those subtenants were defendants in an eviction lawsuit filed by Kamin’s landlord.

The Illinois Attorney Registration & Disciplinary Commission suspended Scott Thomas Kamin, a Chicago Attorney

The attorney representing the parents of a police dispatcher suspiciously killed by a gunshot wound to her head was suspended from practicing law the day after he filed a wrongful death suit on their behalf.

The Illinois Attorney Registration & Disciplinary Commission suspended Scott Thomas Kamin, a Chicago attorney representing the parents of Samantha Harer, for about three months.

 

Harer’s parents, Kevin and Heather Harer, sued Crest Hill police Officer Felipe “Phil” Flores, the city of Crest Hill and the village of Channahon.

The commission is an administrative agency established by the Illinois Supreme Court.

The commission found that Kamin, who was licensed as an attorney in 1995, “dishonestly accepted service of a complaint and summonses for the subtenants in his office suite.” Those subtenants were defendants in an eviction lawsuit filed by Kamin’s landlord.

Kamin concealed the lawsuit from the subtenants, the commission found. His suspension was effective Thursday and scheduled to end Jan. 9.

When Kamin was asked why he was handling the Harers’ case in light of his suspension, he asked, “Why not?”

“My staff is dealing with it and I’m going to be dealing with it personally,” Kamin said.

He said his co-counsel, Anthony Hill, and a paralegal will conduct investigations and handle the case until his suspension is over.

Heather Harer said she received a notice from Kamin’s law firm Friday afternoon that another attorney would be working on their lawsuit. After learning of Kamin’s suspension, she said she didn’t know what to do.

“At this point, we’re at a loss. We’ve been doing nothing but fight, fight, fight. I don’t know what to do anymore,” Heather Harer said.

Six days after Samantha Harer, a 24-year-old resident of Channahon, was found dead of a gunshot wound to the head Feb. 13, the Herald-News submitted a request for documents under the Illinois Freedom of Information Act.

The request asked for a recording and/or transcript of the 911 call alerting police to Harer’s death.

Less than 10 minutes after the request for a record of the call was submitted to the Western Will County Communication Center, or WESCOM, the public body’s executive director, Steve Rauter, denied the request. In his email response, Rauter cited a legal exemption for documents pertaining to an open investigation by police.

Flores was the only other person in Samantha Harer’s apartment at the time of her death. Flores was her boyfriend at the time and also a Crest Hill police officer. Flores was put on paid administrative leave and has yet to be reinstated to his job.

After Rauter’s denial, The Herald-News appealed to the Illinois Attorney General’s Office. In August, the attorney general’s office sent a letter saying WESCOM “improperly withheld the record responsive” to the request. It concluded that WESCOM “did not demonstrate by clear and convincing evidence that the 9-1-1 call recording is exempt from disclosure.”

However, WESCOM refused to turn over the 911 call.

 

theherald-news.com