Tampa Attorney Nathaniel W. Tindall Has Been Voluntarily Disbarred

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"Tindall had several disciplinary matters against him that involved lack of diligence, lack of communication and many trust account violations,"

Tampa Attorney Nathaniel W. Tindall Has Been Voluntarily Disbarred

TALLAHASSEE (Florida Record) — Longtime Tampa attorney Nathaniel W. Tindall has been voluntarily disbarred following a Aug. 24 Florida Supreme Court order pending disciplinary matters against him, according to a recent announcement by The Florida Bar.

"Tindall had several disciplinary matters against him that involved lack of diligence, lack of communication and many trust account violations," the state bar said in its July 31 announcement of the discipline and the Supreme Court's order.

In its two-page order, the Supreme Court accepted Tindall's uncontested petition for disciplinary revocation with leave to seek readmission after five years. Disciplinary revocation is tantamount to disbarment.

Attorneys disbarred in the state generally may not reapply for admission for five years and then they must pass an extensive process that includes a rigorous background check and retaking the bar exam.

The court also ordered Tindall to pay about $3,515 in costs.

Tindall's disbarment was effective 60 days from the date of the court's order to allow him time to close his practice and protect his existing clients' interests, according to the high court's order.

Florida court orders are not final until time to file a rehearing motion expires. Filing such a motion does not alter the  effective date of Tindall's suspension

Tindall was admitted to the bar in Florida on May 10, 1974, according to his profile at the state bar website.

In a previous discipline, Tindall was publicly reprimanded following a December 2010 Supreme Court order. The consent judgment filed with the court at the time said he filed a civil rights lawsuit in federal court in which the court found he should have made claims in previous state court litigation. In that matter, Tindall agreed to pay $5,000 to a charitable foundation without any admission of wrongdoing and the court "entered an order soundly admonishing [Tindall] for filing redundant claims," the consent judgment said.

 

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